Walking in their footsteps: The women who shaped the National Trust

‘We all want quiet. We all want beauty … we all need space.’ In this past year, the importance of nature and outside spaces has never been greater. Many turn to nature as a form of therapy, a way to unwind and relax. The National Trust has for many provided this green space, in theContinue reading “Walking in their footsteps: The women who shaped the National Trust”

From the street corner to stardom: The incredible life of Josephine Baker

If you were to travel to St. Louis, Missouri, to the Union Station in the early 1900s, you would see a young black girl playing in the railway yard and making her money by dancing on the street corner. This girl is Freda Josephine McDonald who was born in St. Louis on June 3, 1906.Continue reading “From the street corner to stardom: The incredible life of Josephine Baker”

Christmas Through The Ages: Celebrations from Saturnalia to the Second World War

Published in Volume 15, New Histories, 27th December 2020. Every year on 21st December the tallest stone at Stonehenge lines up with the rising sun. The midwinter solstice would have been a very important day for Neolithic people. Archaeological evidence from around Stonehenge shows us that they had immense feasts – from pork and beefContinue reading “Christmas Through The Ages: Celebrations from Saturnalia to the Second World War”

Hope between the horrors: The forgotten LGBT firsts in Weimar Germany

Published in Volume 14, New Histories, 19th October 2020. There seems to be an incorrect assumption within the LGBT community that before the Stonewall riots in the summer of 1969, queer individuals lived in secrecy. However, we only have to turn to the vibrant night-life of 1920’s Berlin and the pioneering work of the InstituteContinue reading “Hope between the horrors: The forgotten LGBT firsts in Weimar Germany”

Thousands of years before Windrush: The significance of Black Romans in Ancient Britain

Published in New Histories Magazine Volume 13 – Commemoration and Celebration on 29th July 2020 and highlighted by the editor in the foreword. As part of the English National Curriculum in primary school, students are taught about the impact of the Roman Empire on Britain. However, I highly doubt that many people reading this article were taught aboutContinue reading “Thousands of years before Windrush: The significance of Black Romans in Ancient Britain”

“I fear I am not in my perfect mind”: Mental health and the perception of madness in Shakespearian England

Published in New Histories Magazine Volume 12 – Mental Health Week on 18th June 2020 and highlighted by the editor in the foreword. In Shakespeare’s plays, ‘madness’ plagues many of the characters. It is thought that the work of John Hall, a physician and Shakespeare’s son-in-law, influenced the playwright’s depiction of mental illness to someContinue reading ““I fear I am not in my perfect mind”: Mental health and the perception of madness in Shakespearian England”

The Great Exhibition: Optimism and Collaboration in the Victorian Era

Published in New Histories Magazine Volume 11 – Uplifting History on 7th May 2020. On 1st May 1851, nestled between the elm trees of Hyde Park, a 564 m long and 33 m high glass structure was about to open to the public. This creation (later known as the Crystal Palace) housed something even moreContinue reading “The Great Exhibition: Optimism and Collaboration in the Victorian Era”

Anne Lister’s Diaries: Decoding the Secrets of The ‘First Modern Lesbian’

Published in New Histories Magazine Volume 10 – Women’s History on 3rd April 2020 and highlighted by the editor in the foreword. The television drama Gentleman Jack, based on the life of 19th-century lesbian Anne Lister, has been ground-breaking in its portrayal of lesbian relationships. Lister is a significant part of queer and women’s historyContinue reading “Anne Lister’s Diaries: Decoding the Secrets of The ‘First Modern Lesbian’”

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